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Bullitt County Public Schools: The Leader in Educational Excellence

District Network Engineer Andrew Hobbs Honored by Kentucky Society for Technology in Education (KySTE)

Andrew Hobbs received the Outstanding Technical Support Award from KySTE

Andrew Hobbs, Network Engineer for Bullitt County Public Schools, was recognized with the Outstanding Technology Support Award during the closing of the 2017 Kentucky Society for Technology in Education (KySTE) conference.

“I was very honored to even be nominated by my coworkers,” Hobbs said. “When I found out I actually won it was very humbling. Our entire department is full of very knowledgeable and hardworking people. It really is a team effort.”

Hobbs was recognized by KySTE President Susan Vincentz, a Technology Integration Specialist for Bullitt County Public Schools, for his outstanding work in managing the network and its servers, writing software applications and maintaining the datacenter.

Properly functioning technology is critical for all realms of education, business and society. District Director of Technology Jim Jackson praised Hobbs for his cutting edge work.

“I would like to congratulate Andy for winning this award and I’m proud to have him as part of our team,” Jackson said.

Bullitt County Public School Superintendent Keith Davis echoed Jackson’s sentiments.

“Andy is a forward thinking, can do individual,” Davis said. “His work over the years has made us a better school district and also saved us untold thousands of dollars.”

This is Hobbs 18th year working for BCPS. He is a product of the school system having attended Mt. Washington and Old Mill Elementary Schools, Mt. Washington Middle School and Bullitt East High School.

His work consists of coming up with solutions to problems that directly affect students and teachers. Hobbs desires that they have the tools to do their jobs and not have to worry about technology.

“It should be seamless, just like turning on a light switch or picking up a phone,” he said. “It has to ‘just work.’”

The most challenging part of the profession is attempting to stay current on emerging technology and selecting the hardware/software that will truly shape instruction long term.

He offers the following advice to those interested in pursuing a career in technology education.

“Get your hands dirty! There is nothing like taking things apart and trying to put them back together to see how they work. Read, read, read….Find someone in the business and bug them to death! Ask questions,” he said.





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